GREEN BUILDINGS



CHAPTER-X-5 (G.O.119 Contd..)

GREEN BUILDINGS AND SUSTAINABILITY PROVISIONS

Green Buildings

Modern buildings consume about 25 to 30 percent of total energy, and up to 30 percent of fresh potable water and generate approximately 40 percent of total waste.

As defined by the Indian Green Building Council (IGBC), a green building is “one which uses less water, optimizes energy efficiency, conserves natural resources, generates less waste and provides healthier spaces for occupants, as compared to a conventional building.”

Green buildings must be environmentally responsible from siting and design to construction, maintenance, renovation and demolition. The first and most widely used ratings system internationally is the American “Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design” (LEED) system.

The institutional frameworks for green buildings in India have developed rating systems that classify green buildings according to their performance on a number of set parameters. In India, the IGBC has adapted LEED to create LEED India and is responsible for certifying buildings under this system. At present, IGBC offers two certifications for office buildings.

LEED for New Construction and Major Renovations: For buildings where the design and operation is fully in the scope and control of owner or developer.

LEED for Core and Shell: Certifies buildings where the owners or developers do not control all aspects of design and construction, e.g. Leased spaces like malls or offices where tenants have control over internal space and may opt for additional green interiors.

LEED points are awarded under five categories for a total of 100 points –

Sustainable sites,

Water efficiency,

Energy and atmosphere,

Materials and resources

Indoor environmental quality.

There are 6 additional points under innovation in design and 4 for regional priority.

Buildings qualify for four levels of certification:

Certified: 40-49 points,

Silver: 50-59 points;

Gold: 60-79 points;

Platinum: 80+ points.

The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) has developed its own ratings system “Green

Rating for Integrated Habitat Assessment” (GRIHA).

GRIHA differs from LEED mainly in that it accounts for features unique to India – for example, the use of non- or partially air conditioned buildings and puts emphasis on local and traditional construction knowledge. Therefore LEED and GRIHA ratings might not be directly comparable.

In 2007, the Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) launched the voluntary Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) that sets minimum energy standards for new commercial buildings having a connected load of 500 KW or contract demand of 600 KVA or more.

In alignment with the priorities of the National Action Plan on Climate Change, BEE has insisted on the State Governments to make the ECBC mandatory. Accordingly the Government of Andhra Pradesh while adopting the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) amended the Andhra Pradesh Building Rules, 2012 and issued the notification in G. O. Ms. No. 30 Dated: 28.01.2014. (see Annexure).

Construction costs: On average, estimates show a gold certified building in India costs between 3 to 7 percent more to build, while platinum costs 12 to 18 percent more and silver only about 2 percent more.

User savings: In terms of running costs savings, green buildings save 25-35 percent on energy use on average and 30 to 85 percent on water consumption annually.

Applicability and Provisions:

All Buildings on various plot sizes above 300sq.m may comply with the green norms and confirm to the requirements mandatory for sanction as mentioned in this Chapter.

The “Andhra Pradesh Energy Conservation Building Code (APECBC)” [Amended Andhra Pradesh Building Rules, 2012] issued in G. O. Ms. No. 30 Dated: 28.01.2014 is applicable to commercial buildings and other Non-Residential Buildings that have a plot area of more than 1000 Square Meters or built up area of 2000 Square Meters and certain categories of buildings such as Multiplexes, Hospitals, Hotels and Convention Centers irrespective of their built up area.

The provisions for green buildings indicated in the table below are applicable on all plots more than 300sq. m in size:

TABLE – 34

Applicability and Provisions for various plot sizes (all use premises) for Green Building Components

Sl.No

Sub- Category

Application plot area (Sq.m)

Provisions for  Residential

Provisions for Non-Residential

(A)

(B)

(C)

(D)

(E)

I

 

 Below 300

Nil

 Nil

 

a

300 to 500

(1). Water Conservation and Management

(a) Rain Water Harvesting (by Recharge)

(2). Solar Energy Utilization

(b) Installation of Solar Assisted Water Heating Systems (Optional)

(4). Waste Management

(1). Water Conservation and Management

(a) Rain Water Harvesting (by Recharge)

(2). Solar Energy Utilization

(b) Installation of Solar Assisted Water Heating Systems

(4). Waste Management

(a) Segregation of Waste

II

a

500 to 1000

(1). Water Conservation and Management  

(a) Rain Water Harvesting (by Recharge)           

(d) Reduction of Hardscape

(2). Solar Energy Utilization

(b) Installation of Solar Assisted Water Heating Systems

(3). Energy Efficiency

(c) Lighting of common areas by Solar Energy/LED devices

(4). Waste Management

(a) Segregation of Waste           

(1). Water Conservation and Management

(a) Rain Water Harvesting

(by Recharge)

(d) Reduction of Hardscape

(2). Solar Energy Utilization

(a) Installation of Solar

Photovoltaic Panels

(b) Installation of Solar Assisted Water Heating Systems

(3). Energy Efficiency

(c) Lighting of common areas by Solar Energy/LED devices

(4). Waste Management

(a) Segregation of Waste

 

b

1,000 to 3,000

(1). Water Conservation and Management  

(a) Rain Water Harvesting

(by Recharge)           

(c) Waste Water Recycle and Reuse     

(d) Reduction of Hardscape

(2). Solar Energy Utilization

(a) Installation of Solar Photovoltaic   Panels

(b) Installation of Solar Assisted Water Heating Systems

(3). Energy Efficiency

(b) Energy Efficiency in HVAC systems          

(c) Lighting of common areas by Solar Energy/LED devices.

(1). Water Conservation and Management           

(a) Rain Water Harvesting (by

Recharge)     

(c) Waste Water Recycle and Reuse     

(d) Reduction of Hardscape

(2). Solar Energy Utilization

(a) Installation of Solar

Photovoltaic Panels

(b) Installation of Solar Assisted Water Heating Systems

(3). Energy Efficiency

(b) Energy Efficiency in HVAC systems          

(c) Lighting of common areas by Solar Energy/ LED devices

III

a

Above 3,000

 (1). Water Conservation and Management  

(a) Rain Water Harvesting (by Recharge)           

(b) Low Water Consumption

Plumbing Fixtures

(c) Waste Water Recycle and Reuse     

(d) Reduction of Hardscape

(2). Solar Energy Utilization

(a) Installation of Solar Photovoltaic   Panels

(b) Installation of Solar  Assisted Water Heating Systems

(3) Energy Efficiency

(a) Low Energy Consumption Lighting Fixtures (Electrical

Appliances – BEE Star and

Energy Efficient  Appliances)

(b) Energy Efficiency in HVAC systems          

(c) Lighting of common areas by Solar Energy/LED devices

(4). Waste Management

(a) Segregation of Waste

(b) Organic Waste  Management

           

(1). Water Conservation and Management           

(a) Rain Water Harvesting (by Recharge)     

(b) Low Water Consumption Plumbing Fixtures

(c) Waste Water Recycle and Reuse     

(d) Reduction of Hardscape

(2). Solar Energy Utilization

(a) Installation of Solar

Photovoltaic   Panels

(b) Installation of Solar Assisted Water Heating Systems

(3) Energy Efficiency

(a) Low Energy  Consumption

Lighting Fixtures (Electrical Appliances – BEE Star and Energy Efficient Appliances)

(b) Energy Efficiency in HVAC systems          

(c) Lighting of common areas by Solar Energy/LED devices

(4). Waste Management

(a) Segregation of Waste

(b) Organic Waste Management

Provisions for Sanction of Building Application:

Water Conservation and Management

Rain Water Harvesting (by Recharge)

Low Water Consumption Plumbing Fixtures

Waste Water Recycle and Reuse

Reduction of Hardscape

Solar Energy Utilization

Installation of Solar Photovoltaic Panels

Installation of Solar Assisted Water Heating Systems           

Energy Efficiency

Low Energy Consumption Lighting Fixtures (Electrical Appliances – BEE Star and Energy Efficient Appliances)

Energy Efficiency in HVAC systems

Lighting of common areas by Solar Energy/LED devices

Waste Management

Segregation of Waste

Organic Waste Management

Provisions for City and Site level greening:

Greening

In alignment with National Sustainable Habitat Mission, the Authority shall encourage augmentation of green cover in the city/plot, by following:

The Urban Greening Guidelines, 2014 and other provisions are as given below –

Provision of minimum 1 tree/every 80sqmt of plot area for plot sizes >100sqmt and planted within the setback of the plot.

Compensatory Plantation for felled/transplanted tress in the ratio 1:3 within the premises under consideration.

Choice of species for plantation in site and abutting the road to be adopted as per Section 8 of the Urban Green Guidelines, 2014.

The unpaved area shall be more than or equal to 20% of the recreational open spaces.       

Water Re-use and Recycling

All building having a minimum discharge of 15,000 liters and above per day or premises consisting of 25 dwelling units and above shall incorporate waste water recycling system. The recycled water should be used for horticultural purposes.

Solar Energy Roof Top Installations

The detailed specifications of the Solar Energy Roof Top Buildings are given in the Policy for Solar Energy Roof Top Buildings which need to be followed.           

Sustainable Waste Management:

Zero Waste is a concept of waste management and planning approaches that emphasize waste prevention as opposed to end waste management. This means restructuring production and distribution systems, designing and managing products and processes to systematically follow the 3R rule of Reduce, Re-use and Re-cycle the volume of waste, to conserve and recover all used resources, and therefore eliminating all discharges to landfills, and prevent air, water and land pollution.

Zero Waste/ land-fill can be achieved by adopting systematic approach of segregation at source by planning, by collection facilitation and most importantly by creating public awareness.

The green waste can be converted into fuel cakes, kitchen waste into manure, construction & demolition waste into bricks, plastic waste into oil, paper, glass and steel back into the same and all residual inert materials can also be converted into bricks.

Achieving zero land-fill is more conveniently possible, if

The collection is made from house to house and some segregation is done at household level and

Separate wet and dry bins must be provided at the ground level.

The recycling is done at decentralized, say, ward or even lower levels.

Sustainability of Building Materials:

Sustainability of natural resources for building materials shall be ensured through conservation of available natural resources and use of supplementary materials such as industrial/agricultural by-products, renewable resources, and factory made building components and recycled construction and demolition waste.

Supplementary building materials (derived or processed waste) shall be suitably used in combination with conventional resources offers dual advantages in purview of health & environmental benefits.

Use of Factory made pre-fab/pre-cast and recycled components with Green benefits:

Panels, hollow slabs, hollow blocks–etc. - conservation of materials, less water requirement.

Fly Ash bricks, Portland Pozzolana cement, Fly ash concrete, phosphor-gypsum based walling & roofing panels, particle wood – recycled use of industrial/ agricultural by-products.

Fly ash/ AAC (Autoclaved aerated light weight concrete) panels/ CLC (Cellular light weight concrete) panels- ensures thermal comfort (significant reduction in air conditioning requirement)

Use of bamboo & rapidly growing plantation timbers- environmental benefits.

Local materials are generally suitable for prevailing geo-climatic conditions & have advantage of low transportation cost & time.

Sustainable use of building materials shall be encouraged which may combine certain mandatory provisions and incentives           

Incentives for the Green Buildings:

The following incentives may be given by the Local Body to those buildings which follow the guidelines issued in the “Andhra Pradesh Energy Conservation Building Code (APECBC)” [Amended Andhra Pradesh Building Rules, 2012] issued in G. O. Ms. No. 30 Dated: 28.01.2014 and obtaining the ratings from the LEED or LEED India or TERI or GRIHA as stated above in these Rules.

20% Reduction on Permit Fees.

Payment of Impact Fee, City Level Infrastructure Impact Fee and Development Charges to be paid in four equal instalments before the Completion Period of the construction as given in the Building Permit Order. The applicant shall submit the postdated cheques before release of the Building.

If the property is sold within three years, one-time reduction of 20% on Duty on Transfer of Property (Surcharge on Stamp Duty) on the submission of Occupancy Certificate issued by the Local Authority.

Procedure for obtaining the incentives:

The applicant shall submit the Building Application with all relevant Plans, Documents and Certificates required as per the details given in these Rules.

In order to obtain the incentives, the applicant shall submit an Undertaking along with the for Building Application duly signed by the architect, landscape architect, structural engineer, electrical engineer, plumber and environmental engineer that the building plans are prepared based on the guidelines given in the “Andhra Pradesh Energy Conservation Building Code (APECBC)” [Amended Andhra Pradesh Building Rules, 2012] issued in G. O. Ms. No. 30 Dated: 28.01.2014 and also the provisions as stated in these rules.

The applicant shall submit an undertaking that he will provide all the requirements as stipulated and shall obtain and enclose a certificate from the LEED or LEED India or TERI or GRIHA which shall certify that the building plans submitted are eligible to be considered under green buildings category.

The Building shall be constructed as per the Sanctioned Plans and the applicant along with the Building Completion Notice shall submit the Certificate obtained from the Agency giving Rating for Green Buildings so as to consider the issue of Occupancy Certificate.

The Local Authority / Sanction Authority shall constitute a committee to examine the details with regard to the fulfilment of guidelines issued in the Andhra Pradesh Energy Conservation Building Code and the parameters as stipulated so as to consider the incentives duly fixing certain guidelines with the approval of the competent authority.

If the applicant fails to complete the building as per the sanctioned plans duly following the guidelines, the concessions given shall be withdrawn and an additional 25% of the Total Building Permit Fee shall be levied.

*****